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Install a recessed vent light

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By combining ventilation and illumination a recessed vent light does both jobs of moving the air and keeping it fresh for a comfortable environment.

Recessed lighting will add light to dark and often difficult to reach spaces in a home and a recessed light that offers ventilation makes it even more useful. A dark shower stall in the bathroom, a tucked away alcove under a mildew-prone stairwell and a stuffy dark closet are popular locations where a vented recessed light comes in handy. By combining ventilation and illumination a recessed vent light does both jobs of moving the air and keeping it fresh for a comfortable environment.

An electrician will charge $239, including labor and material, to replace an existing fixture with a recessed vent light. It’s a basic swap-out of one unit for another because there’s an electrical line to tap into. A homeowner with electrical tools and experience can do the job for $130, the cost of the recessed vent light. However, if a new power source is needed, definitely call an electrician, who will charge $100 or more to run a new electrical line and install the unit.

The job involves investigating the electrical system in the house where the light will be installed, and then tapping into the existing system and installing the fixture and trim ring.

The cost will be higher if access to the unit is limited and if the ceiling joists run perpendicular to the direction of the vent duct. All the variables make this a job best left to a licensed electrician.

To find more DIY project costs and to post comments and questions, visit www.diyornot.com.

Pro Cost — DIY Cost — Pro time — DIY Time — DIY Savings — Percent Saved

$239 — $130 — 1.3 — 4.5 — $109 — 46%

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