You are the owner of this page.
A9 A9
Obituaries
William 'Bill' J. Neuberger Jr.

William 'Bill' J. Neuberger, Jr.

June 13, 1936 - November 5, 2017

KLEMME, IA | William 'Bill' J. Neuberger, Jr., 81, a lifelong Klemme area resident and farmer, died, Sunday, November 5, 2017, at Muse-Norris Hospice Inpatient, Mason City, IA. Funeral services will be Saturday, November 11, 2017, 10:30 AM, at the Klemme United Methodist Church. The Reverend Wayne Bruggeman will be officiating. Burial will be in the Ell Township Cemetery, Klemme. Visitation will be Friday from 5-8 PM, at Andrews Funeral Home, 528 East Main St., Klemme, and will continue one hour prior to the services at church Saturday.

William John Neuberger, Jr., the son of William James, Sr. and Emma (Christians) Neuberger, was born on the family farm east of Klemme, Ell Township, Hancock County, on June 13, 1936. Over his entire life journey he lived within 6 miles of his original childhood home.

Bill attended school and graduated from Ventura High School in Ventura, IA, with the Class of 1954. As a young person he worked with his father on the farm and eventually made farming his life long vocation. He truly loved to work the land, raise livestock, and very much enjoyed the rewards of his labors. He cherished life on the farm and instilled this love for the land and the animals in the minds of his children.

Bill was united in marriage to Madonna Suntken on September 6, 1957 at the First Reformed Church of Meservey. Their union was blessed with a daughter Barbara and son Wayne. The couple raised their children east of Klemme where each of the family members worked along side one another in the tasks and chores of the farm. He was a man who valued hard work and passed that down to his children and their families.

Bill had raised dairy cattle, hogs, chickens and crops. He was very meticulous in his mannerisms and everything had a place and was well maintained whether it was his machinery, vehicles, home, weed free fields or his well manicured yard, he took great pride in all that he cared for. He had been active on the farm even as recently as his 80th year of life.

Bill was a life long member of the Klemme United Methodist Church where he was baptized and confirmed as a child. Following his and Madonna's marriage the couple were very active in the church bringing their kids to Sunday school Bible school and Sunday services. Bill was active over the years on church boards, as a trustee and on the council. He volunteered to care and mow the church yard for 18 years and had taken care of many other yards in the community of Klemme keeping them in tip top shape. He had also served on Farm Bureau for a time. In more recent times one would see his red pickup parked at Maxyield in Klemme, where he would spend mornings at the 'Klemme Coffee Clutch' at the Co-op getting caught up on the happenings in the world of agriculture with his many farming buddies.

Bill and Madonna enjoyed wintering for a couple months at time in Texas, 22 of those years were spent at their place in Weslaco where many of their friends from the north Iowa area also resided in the winters.

Bill dearly loved his wife and life partner of more than 60 years, his children and their families as well as times spent with his siblings and extended family. He was a man of integrity and honesty who enjoyed the simple pleasures of the farm life. He loved family gatherings and was always up for a friendly game of cards. He loved to work jigsaw puzzles and had spent countless hours completing dozens of them. He was always friendly and warm in nature and had a unique since of humor and wit.

Those left to cherish the memory of his life and legacy include his wife Madonna Neuberger, Klemme, IA; daughter Barbara (Rusty) Murl, Indianola, IA; son Wayne (Juli) Neuberger, Ventura, IA; grandchildren: Matt Murl, Stacey (Josh) Jensen, Keri (Brent) Ausborn, Ashley (Jon) VanDusseldorp, Jacob Neuberger, Jessica Neuberger and Andrew Murl; 7 great grandchildren: Emily Ausborn, Kaylie Jensen, Eli Ausborn, Ryker Murl, Eben VanDusseldorp, Owen Jensen, and Skylar Neuberger; Bill's siblings: Marie Jurgens, Latimer, IA,

David Neuberger, Garner, IA, Margaret Parrett, Phoenix, AZ, Marilyn Cox, Anthem, AZ, and Mike (Marcia Evans), Thilisi, Georgia, near Russia; a brother-in-law Elwyn Herman, Brownsville, TX; additional in laws including: Donna (Ron) Symens, Sheffield, IA, Janet (Derald) Pals, Belmond, IA, and JIm (Dianna) Suntken, Belmond, IA, as well as many nieces and nephews.

Bill was preceded in death by his parents, grandson Daniel Murl, and 2 sisters Marna Herman and Marlys Luscombe.

Andrews Funeral Home, Klemme, IA. www.andrewsfuneralhomeandfloral.com 641-587-2510.


Death-notices
Leona M. Studer

Leona M. Studer

CLARION | Leona M. Studer, 89, of Clarion passed away on Monday, November 6, 2017 at the Rehabilitation Center of Belmond.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 10:30 AM at St. John's Catholic Church, 608 2nd Avenue North East in Clarion, with Monsignor John Hemann and Deacon Dr. Michael Whitters officiating. Burial will take place at St. John's Catholic Cemetery in Clarion.

Visitation will be held on Friday, November 10, 2017 from 5:00 PM until 7:00 PM, with a Rosary and Scriptural Wake Service beginning at 7:00 PM, at Ewing Funeral Home, 1801 Central Avenue East in Clarion. Visitation will continue one hour prior to services at the church on Saturday.

www.ewingfh.com


Obituaries
Charlotte M. Fulghum

Charlotte M. Fulghum

July 1, 1924 - November 5, 2017

MASON CITY | Charlotte M. Fulghum, 93, died Sunday, November 5, 2017 at the Muse Norris Hospice Inpatient Unit. Funeral services will be held at 11:00 AM on Friday, November 10, 2017, at the Zion Lutheran Church, 112 N 4th St, Clear Lake, IA. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service. Interment will take place in Memorial Park Cemetery. Memorials can be directed to Hospice of North Iowa. Online condolences may be left for the family at www.majorericksonfuneralhome.com.

Charlotte Maxine Thompson Fulghum was born July 1, 1924 in Mason City, daughter of John and Martha (Adams) Thompson. She received her early education in various rural schools and graduated in 1942 from Mason City High School. After graduation, she worked as a telephone operator for North Western Bell for 1½ years. In 1946, she graduated from the College of Nursing in Iowa City, participating in the Cadet Nurse Corps during WW II as a RN. In the same year, she was married to Bill Otterman and 2 sons, Kirk ad Kent followed.

In her professional life as a RN and also raising her family, she worked as Mercy Hospital in Iowa City, IA, Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, VA, Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, Baylor Hospital in Dallas, TX, Methodist Hospital in Houston, TX, and as a staff nurse on the obstetrics floor at Mercy Hospital in Mason City. She worked for 10 years doing private nursing at both Mason City Hospitals in Mason City. She moved to Miami, FL where she worked one year doing private home and hospital nursing. In 1973 she began as staff nurse at Americana Nursing Home, later known as Manor Care Extended Care. She was there for 17 years. She retired in 1991 from Home Health Care of Mercy Hospital in Mason City.

In 1983, Charlotte married Willard Fulgham and continued living in Mason City, and they spent 25 winters in Weslaco, Texas.

Charlotte was baptized as a child into the Lutheran faith and confirmed as a young adult. She was a long time member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Mason City and later Zion Lutheran Church in Clear Lake. Her faith came alive in the 1960s when she and her husband co-sponsored a youth group called “The Revelation”. This ministry helped young people with their personal faith in God and Bible study. This included her son, Kent, who later became a pastor. She was a member of a weekly prayer group, the Zion Lutheran Church prayer chain, and a hospital visitor from Zion Lutheran Church. In Texas, she was active in a weekly Bible study.

Her great interests were her family; 2 boys, grandchildren and great grandchildren, and living for and serving the Lord. She was a member of the Mercy Medical North Iowa volunteers since 1991, accumulating over 100 hours and was honored for 20 years of service.

She is preceded in death by her parents and her brother, John Thompson.

She is survived by her husband, Willard; two sons; Kirk Otterman, Atlo, GA and Kent (Cathy) Otterman, Albert Lea, MN; two grandchildren, Angela (Robert) Hoffman, Albert Lea, MN and Joshua (Anna) Otterman, St. Louis, MO; two great grandchildren: Ender and Iden Otterman of St. Louis, MO; three step children, David Fulghum, Western Springs, IL, Joanne (David) Schumacher, Lincoln, CA, and Janiece Ehler, Louisiana; six step grandchildren, Kristen, Kaylyn, Margaret, Liz, Kate, Brad; four step great grandchildren; one special niece, Shelly Thompson, two nephews, Bart Thompson and Brad Thompson.

Arrangements are with Major Erickson Funeral Home & Crematory, 111 N. Pennsylvania Avenue, Mason City, Iowa 50401, 641-423-0924, www.majorericksonfuneralhome.com.


Funerals_today
Funerals Thursday, Nov. 9

DOHLMAN, Elizabeth Mary, 60, Riceville, 10:30 a.m. at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Riceville.

ELIASON, Carol “Maxine,” 94, a lifelong resident of the Kanawha and Belmond areas, 10:30 a.m. at St. Olaf Lutheran Church, rural Belmond.

MARTIN, Clyde L., 94, Osage, 1 p.m. at Hogan-Bremer-Moore Colonial Chapel, Mason City.

MIKKELSEN, Leland Howard, 96 of Clear Lake, 2 p.m. at Oakwood Care Center, Clear Lake.

REED, Mary I., 88, Mason City, , and formerly of Marble Rock, 9 a.m. at Faith Baptist Church, Mason City.

WHEELER, Esther L., 93, Mason City, 1:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church, Mason City.


Funerals_today
Funerals Friday, Nov. 10

ENTNER, Timothy Alan, 57 of Clear Lake, 10 a.m. at Harvest Bible Church, Clear Lake.

FISHER, Marvin F., 88, Riceville, 10:30 a.m. at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Osage.

FULGHUM, Charlotte M., 93, 11 a.m. at the Zion Lutheran Church, Clear Lake.

MEYER, John Charles, 83, Northwood, 10:30 a.m. at the First Lutheran Church, Northwood.


Daily Calendar
Daily Calendar, Thursday, Nov. 16

MEETINGS

MASON CITY | North Iowa Area Community College board will meet at 7 p.m. in the Pierce Administration Building on the NIACC campus.

EVENTS

MASON CITY | The Mason City Senior Activity Center, 326 Fourth St. N.E., will hold public bingo, with early birds at 6:30 p.m. followed by the regular session at 7.


Obituaries
Steve Meyers

Steve Meyers

CLEAR LAKE | Steve Meyers, 66, of Clear Lake passed away at his home on November 6, 2017.

A memorial service will be held 10:30 a.m. Saturday, November 11, 2017 at Ward-Van Slyke Colonial Chapel, 101 N 4th St, Clear Lake, IA 50428 with Father Gehling officiating. Inurnment will be held at a later date.

Visitation will be from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Friday, November 10, 2017 at the funeral chapel.

Stephen “Steve” Ray Meyers was born on December 11, 1950 to Raymond and Anna Katherine (Thompson) Meyers. He grew up in Mason City, graduating from Mason City High School in 1969. After graduation, Steve enlisted into the United States Army, where he served his country honorably. During his service Steve worked as a mechanic. Following his honorable discharge he came home and began working as a mechanic for Stockberger Transfer and Storage. In 1985 Steve established Meyer's Wrecker and Repair and had owned the company for almost 30 years. On June 9th, 1989 Steve married Rosemary “Rosie” Nielsen.

Steve was an avid outdoors man who wouldn't miss an opportunity to go hunting or fishing. Each year he took a fishing trip to Canada. He enjoyed watching westerns and listening to music. Each morning Steve looked forward to coffee with his friends, especially on Sundays.

He was a member of the Clear Lake VFW.

Steve is survived by his children, Heidi O'Neil of Cedar Rapids and Erik (Abbey) Meyers of Apple Valley, MN; grandchildren, Luke O'Neil, Evelynn and Peyton Meyers; step-children, Jacqueline “Jackie” (Rick) Buchan and Brent Shoop; step-grandchildren, Mitchell and Trevor Buchan, and Anna and Abby Shoop; siblings, Mike (Diana) Meyers, Ted Meyers, and Wendy Ebbers; his aunt, Cora (Don) Miller; as well as many extended family members and many friends.

He is preceded in death by his wife, Rosie Meyers in 2012, parents, and sister Kathy Maas in 2016.

Ward-Van Slyke Colonial Chapel 101 N 4th St, Clear Lake, IA 50428. 641-357-2193. ColonialChapels.com


Lee-wire
AP
Boy with rare disease gets new skin with gene therapy

LONDON — Doctors treating a critically ill boy with a devastating skin disease used experimental gene therapy to create an entirely new skin for most of his body in a desperate attempt to save his life.

Two years later, the doctors report the boy is doing so well that he doesn't need any medication, is back in school and even playing soccer.

"We were forced to do something dramatic because this kid was dying," said Dr. Michele De Luca of the University of Modena in Italy, who got a call for help from the German doctors treating the boy.

The boy, then 7, was hospitalized in June 2015 with blisters on his limbs, back and elsewhere. He quickly lost about 60 percent of the outer layer of his skin and was put into an induced coma to spare him further suffering. Doctors at Children's Hospital at Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, tried skin grafts from his father and donor skin, but all failed.

"He was in severe pain and asking a lot of questions," the boy's father said in a video provided by the hospital "Why do I suffer from this disease? Why do I have to live this life? All children can run around and play, why am I not allowed to play soccer? I couldn't answer these questions."

The boy's parents asked about experimental treatments, and De Luca and his colleagues were contacted. They had previously used gene therapy to produce a small piece of skin in a similar case. They told the family that the boy's precarious state meant that he might not survive the complicated surgeries needed to save him.

"It was a tough decision for us, but we wanted to try for (our son)," the boy's father said. The family asked that their names not be used to protect the boy's privacy.

The boy had a rare, incurable skin disease called junctional epidermolysis bullosa, caused by genetic mutations. People with the disease lack critical proteins that attach the outer layer of the skin to the inner layer, resulting in fragile skin with almost constant blisters and open sores.

To fix that, the doctors took a small piece of the boy's skin from an area that was OK. In the lab, they added a normal version of his bad gene to his skin cells. They grew sheets of the boy's skin, in much the same way skin grafts are grown for burn victims.

In total, they grew close to 3 square feet of skin. The lab-grown skin was then transplanted onto the boy in three operations, ultimately covering 80 percent of his body. Ten days later, the new skin was already beginning to grow, De Luca said. After eight months, the doctors said that nearly all of the boy's skin had been generated by the modified stem cells.

So far, no problems have been detected. De Luca said the boy will be monitored closely for skin cancer and other potential issues.

"This kid is back to his normal life again," one of the German doctors, Dr. Tobias Rothoeft, said Wednesday. "That's what we dreamed of doing and it was possible."

Details of the case were published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

"This takes us a huge step forward," said Dr. Peter Marinkovich of Stanford University School of Medicine, who has done related work. He said it was impressive that De Luca and colleagues were able to make such large amounts of viable skin after correcting the genetic defect.

But he noted the approach might not help in more serious cases, which often have tricky complications, like skin blistering in the lungs. Marinkovich said many patients don't survive beyond age 2 and that using the treatment for babies could be even riskier.

Dr. Holm Schneider warned that some severely ill patients might have an extreme reaction to skin transplants with an added gene.

"The immune system might recognize this new gene as something foreign to be attacked and destroyed," said Schneider, of the University Hospital Erlangen in Germany. Still, he said the approach was worth trying in dying patients.

The boy and his family later visited De Luca and the other Italian doctors involved in his treatment.

"The parents are very grateful and say their life has completely changed," De Luca said, recalling how the boy spontaneously began taking off his clothes. "The boy was so happy with his new skin that he wanted to show off."